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News from Natural Sciences

Three recipients of ERC Consolidator Grants come from Science and Technology. (Ill: Colourbox)

2018.12.04 | Public / media, Staff

Three ERC Consolidator Grants for researchers at Science and Technology

The recipients of the coveted Consolidator Grants from the European Research Council (ERC) have just been announced. Aarhus University has received six out of the seven Danish grants, and three recipients come from Science and Technology.

Sperm whales exemplify the evolutionary drive for highly intense echolocation – their nose is a massive sound generator that can take up as much as 1/3rd of the body size of an adult male. Photo: Chris Johnson.
Small toothed whales, like the harbor porpoise that is found in Danish waters, echolocate at much higher frequencies than large toothed whales, helping them maintain a narrow biosonar. Photo: Ecomare/Salko de Wolf [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

2018.11.15 | Public / media

A bigger nose, a bigger bang: size matters for echolocating toothed whales

Whales, dolphins, and porpoises have all evolved to use similar narrow beams of high intensity sound to echolocate prey. Far from being inefficient, this highly focused sense may have helped them succeed as top predators in the world's oceans.

An artist’s depiction of the iron meteorite hurtling through space before impacting in northwest Greenland. Grafics: NASA
Map of Greenland showing the location of the Hiawatha impact crater in Inglefield Land, along the northwest margin of the Greenland Ice sheet.
Close-up of the northwestern ice-sheet margin in Inglefield Land. The Hiawatha impact crater was discovered beneath the semi-circular ice margin. The structure is also imprinted on the shape of the ice surface, even though it lies nearly 1000 meters below the ice surface. Hiawatha is named after outlet glacier at the edge of the ice sheet. The name was given by Lauge Koch in 1922 during an expedition around northern Greenland, while thinking of the pre-colonial native American leader and co-founder of the Iroquois Confederacy. Grafics: NASA

2018.11.14 | Public / media

Massive impact crater from a kilometre-wide iron meteorite discovered in Greenland

An international team lead by researchers from University of Copenhagen and Aarhus University have discovered a 31-km wide meteorite impact crater buried beneath the ice-sheet in the northern Greenland. This is the first time that a crater of any size has been found under one of Earth’s continental ice sheets. The researchers worked for last three…