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Using geophysical technology, the project will find a solution for calculating the flow of the cleaning agents below the ground, and the data will then be processed and transformed into a visual 3D model that guides the injection

2018.10.22 | Public / media, Grant, Business

New innovation project to boost the use of biotechnology for the cleanup of contaminated soil

Ejlskov A / S and Aarhus University work together to develop a faster, cheaper and easier method for cleaning contaminated soil without the need for excavators. Real-time 3D scanning of the subsoil allows biotechnological cleansers to be injected accurately into the contaminated underground, as well as monitoring simultaneously how the cleansers…

The secretive indri (Indri indri) of Madagascar is the largest living lemur. It is also critically endangered and highly evolutionarily distinct with no close relatives, a combination that makes its branch one of most precarious on the mammal evolutionary tree. In the likely event that the indri goes extinct, we will lose 19 million years of unique evolutionary history from the mammal tree of life. Photo:©pierivb, Depositphotos.com
An illustration of how smaller mammals - here exemplified by a nutria - will have to diversify for the next 3-5 million years to restore the loss of the large mammals. Graphics: Matt Davis, Aarhus Universitet.
Litopterns, like this Macrauchenia patachonica discovered by Charles Darwin, were a strange looking group of prehistoric South American mammals that were not closely related to any species alive today–they diverged evolutionarily from other mammals over 65 million years ago. When they went extinct at the end of the Ice Age, the mammal Tree of Life lost one of its deepest branches. Illustration:Bruce Horsfall, Macmillan, New York. Via Wikimedia Commons

2018.10.15 | Public / media, Press release

Mammals cannot evolve fast enough to escape current extinction crisis

We humans are exterminating animal and plant species so quickly that nature's built-in defence mechanism, evolution, cannot keep up. An Aarhus-led research team calculated that if current conservation efforts are not improved, so many mammal species will become extinct during the next five decades that nature will need 3-5 million years to recover.

Jacob Sherson has been awarded the Grundfos Prize for 2018. (Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Photo.)

2018.10.12 | Public / media, Staff

Bigger. More. Better.

Professor with special responsibilities Jacob Sherson has a mission; he want to reinvent the way computers and humans interact. He’s reinvented himself a few times along the way, and today he says he’s a sort of version 3.0 of himself. The physicist has now been awarded the 2018 Grundfos Prize of DKK 1 mill. for his work on the interface between…